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I Am The Law

I Am The Law is a show about law jobs. We profile recent and seasoned law school graduates in different jobs to help listeners learn about the legal profession.
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Now displaying: July, 2015
Jul 27, 2015

This episode is presented by The United States Air Force Judge Advocate General's Corp.

When is enough...enough?

Jaye Lindsay decided he'd had enough just 3.5 years after graduating from Southern Illinois University School of Law. His first job out of law school wasn't glamorous, but the steady pay and hands-on litigation experience made up for a lack of health insurance and low hourly wages. But over time, he wanted more work-life balance and a better standard of living for his wife and new kids.

Jaye tried a new firm in rural Illinois. It collapsed after a month. He tried going solo back in Chicago. It only allowed him to barely get by. He signed on with another firm at an hourly rate while maintaining his solo practice. But he wasn't crazy about the lack of benefits or the type of work, which wasn't even consistent. Finding it impossible to manage his average-size debt load, Jaye decided to move with his family to Florida and become a high school special education teacher.

This non-traditional episode is about more than Jaye's decision to become a teacher and practice law on the side. It's also a window into the economics of small law firms, the trade-offs that clients face when they cannot afford a lawyer, and how people juggle and evaluate life priorities.

This episode is hosted by Kimber Russell, an account executive for Planet Depos, an international court reporting firm. It is sponsored by Barbri Law Preview and Top-Law-Schools.com.

Jul 19, 2015

This episode is presented by The United States Air Force Judge Advocate General's Corp.

Smaller law practices are often organized around just a few practice areas -- or even just one. Sometimes, however, lawyers organize their firms around the types of clients they seek. These niche firms end up doing many types of work for many similar clients.

Ryan Morrison, a 2013 graduate of New York Law School, created a firm centered on helping video game developers. As such, the work he does for his clients varies based on whatever they need -- usually intellectual property and contracts -- and he outsources whatever he can't do.

In this episode, Ryan tells us how he managed to build a rare practice from a pro bono matter. He also tells us about his biggest challenges, including educating developers that they need a lawyer in the first place. It turns out that, due to who can and does make games today, a lot of people find themselves in hot water for what amounts to ignorance of the law.

This episode is hosted by Derek Tokaz, an academic writing teacher at American University. It is sponsored by Barbri Law Preview and Top-Law-Schools.com.

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Jul 13, 2015

This episode is presented by The United States Air Force Judge Advocate General's Corp.

The Supreme Court's decision to extend the right to marry to same-sex couples advanced civil rights last month, but also lawyers' bottom lines. As the LGBTQ community acquires new rights and responsibilities, lawyers have the opportunity for new revenue streams as they engage the civil justice system on behalf of clients who previously did not have equitable access.

In this episode, we hear from Meaghan Hearne, a graduate of Syracuse University College of Law. She's involved in a variety of general practice areas, from civil litigation and criminal defense to divorces and child custody. But much of her work engages LGBTQ clients and issues. Earlier in her career Meaghan protected same-sex, unmarried couples who nevertheless wanted the protections marriage afforded opposite-sex couples. She will likely keep doing volumes of work for the LGBTQ community. Currently, she's working on a civil litigation case that's moving the needle on who's protected from employment discrimination.

This episode is hosted by Debby Merritt, a law professor at Ohio State University. It is sponsored by Barbri Law Preview and Top-Law-Schools.com.

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Jul 6, 2015

This episode is presented by The United States Air Force Judge Advocate General's Corp.

Each of the five U.S. military branches has a large legal staff that handles civil litigation, criminal prosecution and defense, servicemen and servicewomen education about rights and responsibilities, and more. With worldwide jurisdiction, the military justice system operates alongside our civilian system and is run by the Judge Advocate General's Corp. -- JAG for short.

In this episode, we hear from an Air Force JAG officer. Captain Megan Mallone is a 2008 graduate of the University of Toledo College of Law and joined the military right after law school. She's not involved in combat, but she does provide legal counsel of all kinds to warfighters. Every Air Force JAG starts as a prosecutor, enforcing military justice for the U.S. government. But after that? Your future is at the mercy of your military commanders.

Megan's original commitment was 4 years, but like many JAG officers, she re-enlisted and continued her varied experience in new places. She deployed to Greece and Qatar while stationed in England, where she supported her military installations to meet their missions.

This episode is hosted by Debby Merritt, a law professor at Ohio State University. It is sponsored by Barbri Law Preview and Top-Law-Schools.com.

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